Image

Archive for poetry

Poetry – Jim Harrison – Return

“Return” by Jim Harrison


The sun’s warm against slats of the granary,
a puddle of ice in the shadow of the steps;
my uncle’s hound
lopes
across the winter wheat,
fresh green cold green.
The windmill long out of use, screeches
and twists in the wind.
Spring day, too loud for talk,
when bones tire of their flesh
and want something better.


http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/jim-harrison

Fall 2014 Issue of Stone Path Review has been published

The Fall 2014 issue of Stone Path Review is now available for reading at http://www.stonepathreview.com and http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/823370?__r=322616

Interview with: Peter Vircks
Poetry by: Amanda Barusch, Anuja Ghimire, Deonte Osayande, Gary Glauber, Lisa Megraw, Ralph Monday, Robert Henschel, Jr., Rochelle Natt, Salvatore Folisi, Samantha Tetangco, Wendy Brown-Baez
Short Story by: John Richmond
Paintings by: Margaret Karmazin
Photography by: Kristy Johnson, Louis Staeble, Rohnda Monroy
Photography for written pieces by: Twisted Root Studios


Stone Path Review Fall 2014

Stone Path Review: Stone Path Review Fall 2014

Issue twelve of the artistic journal Stone Path Review featuring an interview with a musician, poetry, short story, paintings, and images of people and nature. The focus is what we harvest and what we become.

Find out more on MagCloud

Summer 2014 Issue Now Available

Volume 3, issue 11 of Stone Path Review is now available for your reading pleasure.

This issue features an interview with a goat farmer, Beth Donovan; photography by A.J. Huffman, Aaron Bowen, Brian Biggs, Claire Ibarra, Galen Faison, and John Sikkila; and writing by David Rutter, J.B. Mulligan, Jeffrey Willius, John Michael Flynn, Kathleen Lindstrom, Kathryn Hujda, Michael Gould, Michael K. Gause, and Sarah Nour.

 

Stone Path Review Summer 2014

Stone Path Review: Stone Path Review Summer 2014

Latest issue of the artistic journal Stone Path Review featuring an interview with a goat farmer, poetry, short stories, and images of people and nature.

Find out more on MagCloud

Poem – From the Marathon

The poem “From the Marathon” from the reading on 05/04/14.

This piece is part of a larger work titled “Marathon Through Open Fields”.


I awoke running through snowy fields,
the bison lumbering with frozen noses and hanging breath
the autumn wheat dusted with snow,
weighed down from ice pellets
they do not budge when I run past.

The marathon continues
down a path I do not know
I have never been here before.

My legs burn. I stop for a moment
near the river’s edge with ice along
the bank, reeds are frozen in time.

Even a breeze upon my chilled face,
does not move them. Near the horizon
over the willow trees reach, ravens
are suspended in mid-flight.

Not a whisper.

Poem – One Truth

The poem “One Truth” from the reading on 05/04/14.


The rain filled dharma is still dharma.

Rain falls in fields of white snow.
If the snow is one truth,
what happens when the snow melts
what happens to the truth?

It becomes the earth.

No matter the state of being
the state of mind the dharma
exists across the empty field.

Clouds touch the moon.
I cover the moon with my thumb.

Light rains upon the
fields I walk across.

Poem – What We Must Do

The poem “What We Must Do” from the reading on 05/04/14.


We found remains
not of the day or night
not of the moon or sun
but of something more
primal and of the earth
and soil carrying its voice
from pastures to fields
to the winter beds.

The remains we found of
creatures roaming
the open space
the land born of themselves.

Searching snow covered grounds
a rake is used like a ship
dredging a canal, but
at the surface, gentle
tugs, attention paid to
the amount of resistance,
the emitted sound when metal
hits a rock, dried wood,
or what I am looking for.

When a brownish blur
catches my eye through cattails
I know I am done.
It’s time to return
you to earth.

2x4s laid in the snow
covered dirt road, away
from low hanging pine limbs
and prairie grasses.

I place your rib cage upon
the altar, sprinkle gasoline
and say a few words
before throwing the match.

Poetry – Video of Reading

Here is a raw video of part small part of the reading from 05/04/14 for Good and Evil, sponsored by Cracked Walnut Literary Festival Reading. It took place at Coffee Bene.

I read the following pieces and will post them separately:

Poetry Month – Poems by Hosai Ozaki

The following are a selection of haiku poems from Right under the big sky, I don’t wear a hat, the haiku and prose of Hosai Ozaki.


I look back at the shore, not one footprint let

The cigarette is dead, I cast away the loneliness

Dead leaves shake down the trees and broom the blue sky

A single garden rock places, evening comes

A pine grove let the children go home and is darkening

Such a good moon, I look at it by myself and go to sleep

I cup sparrow’s warmth, let it go

Poetry Month – Poems By Zen Masters

The following translations are from the book Original Teachings of Chan Buddhism, by Chang Chun-Yuan, A Vintage Book, 1971.


From Master Tsao-shan

He who says that a dragon is singing in the dry woods
Is he who truly sees Tao.
The skull has no consciousness,
But wisdom’s eye begins to shine in it.
If joy and consciousness should be eliminated,
Then fluctuations and communication would cease.
Those who dry this do not understand
That purity is impure.

From Master Fen-yang

Under the moonlight are the towers and chambers of a thousand houses;
Lying in the autumn air are lakes and rivers of myriad li.
Blossoms blow in the reeds, differing not in their colors.
A white bird descends the white sandbank of a stream.

Poetry Month – Poems by Zen Master Ryokan

Selections 4 and 5 for National Poetry Month. These two poems of Zen Master Ryokan are from Dewdrops on a Lotus Leaf, Zen Poems of Ryokan, translated by John Stevens.


Untitled

If someone asks
My abode
I reply:
“The east edge of
The Milky Way.”

Like a drifting cloud,
Bound by nothing:
I just let go
Giving myself up
To the whim of the wind

The Autumn Moon

The moon appears in every season, it is true,
But surely it’s best in fall.
In autumn, mountains loom and water runs clear.
A brilliant disk floats across the infinite sky,
And there is no sense of light and darkness,
For everything is permeated with its presence.
The boundless sky above, the autumn chill on my face.
I take my precious staff and wander about the hills.
Not a speck of the world’s dust anywhere,
Just the brilliant beams of moonlight.
I hope others, too, are gazing on this moon tonight,
And that it’s illuminating all kinds of people.
Autumn after autumn, the moonlight comes and goes;
Human beings will gaze upon it for eternity.
The sermons of Buddha, the preaching of Eno,
Surely occurred under the same kind of moon.
I contemplate the moon through the night,
As the stream settles, and white dew descends.
Which wayfarer will bask in the moonlight longest?
Whose home will drink up the most moonbeams?


ryokan

Poetry Month – Poem by Wendy Brown-Baez

For the 2014 National Poetry Month, a poem by Wendy Brown-Baez


At the Western Wall, by Wendy Brown-Baez
From transparencies of light, 2011, Finishing Line Press

I saw here at the Wall
flattened against the stones by prayer
and I thought:
Where is her God
now that our tears
have tuned to blood?

She brushed the wind
out of her hair, and wiped
her eyes on the tiny slip of paper
folded and refolded
as if to protect
the fragile message inside,
as if the crushing weight of war
had not already torn it into shreds.

Can God read
invisible ink?
and I thought of how our
hearts were like that paper
folded within themselves
destined to the least crack in the stones.


0_0_0_0_202_296_csupload_34539153

Author Focus – John Haines

I first learned of John Haines while taking a class at the Loft Literary Center a few years ago.  From the first poem I was hooked.  I have every book of his, some first editions, and one signed that I was fortunate to find.

Mr. Haines also wrote many essays about nature, the world at large, and his view from a small rustic cabin located outside of Fairbanks, AK.

Mr. Haines was born on June 29, 1924 and passed away on March 2, 2011. I sadly never got the chance to meet him in person, but continue to read his books and write pieces about him and be inspired by the raw, simple, and powerful pieces he created.

I am particularly fond of “Owl in the Mask of the Dreamer” for poetry and “Fables and Distances” for his essays.

Below are his most easily found books on Amazon.

Cover Title Publisher
51JKNEG1A6L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ The Stars, the Snow, the Fire: Twenty-Five Years in the Alaska Wilderness Graywolf Press (March 1, 2000)
41HH5DF4X9L._SY300_ Living Off the Country: Essays on Poetry and Place (Poets on Poetry) University of Michigan Press (January 1, 1982)
519H1KF17PL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ The Owl in the Mask of the Dreamer: Collected Poems Graywolf Press; 1st edition (September 1, 1993)
51VY8F0C6ZL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ For the Century’s End: Poems 1990-1999 (Pacific Northwest Poetry) University of Washington Press (January 1, 2001)
41IYJ6ABaDL._SY344_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_ At the End of this Summer: Poems, 1948-1954 Copper Canyon Press (September 1, 1997)
41TJ0EFWEQL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ Fables and Distances: New and Selected Essays Graywolf Press (January 1, 1996)
51DeUhh44TL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ News from the Glacier: Selected Poems, 1960-1980 Wesleyan (April 1, 1982)
51IZ0uavIYL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ The Stone Harp (Wesleyan Poetry Program) Wesleyan (July 1, 1971)

Play Review and New Poetry – 01/26/14

New content has been added to the Stone Path Review Website.

SPR-01

Call for Submissions

Now that the Winter 2014 issue of Stone Path Review has been published, we look ahead…

We are always accepting, reading, and responding to submissions.  We accept poetry, short stories, prose, and visual arts.  We are especially looking for photography, both for the cover and inside, drawings, original artwork, photos of artwork, etc.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

Please follow our blog or like us on Facebook for more information and announcements.

Thank you for your patience and to our readers and artists who have trusted their work with us. We would not be here without you.

Stone Path Review – Winter 2014

I am proud to announce that we just finished the Winter 2014 issue of Stone Path Review.  You are able to view it online, as a flip-book, or download a PDF.  This issue features poetry, photography, a short story, and an interview with the director of a mountain guide training school located in Alaska and Patagonia.


Stone Path Review Winter 2014

Stone Path Review: Stone Path Review Winter 2014

Artistic journal of poetry, photography, short stories and an interview with the director of a mountain guide training school.

Find out more on MagCloud

Fall 2013 – Available as Flip-book or to Purchase

THe flip-book version of the magazine can be viewed, or purchased at the following website.

Stone Path Review Fall 2013

Stone Path Review: Stone Path Review Fall 2013

Artistic Journal with poetry, photography, featured artist interview, and short stories. We are artists publishing journals for other artists.

Find out more on MagCloud

Fall 2013 Has Been Published

The 8th issue of Stone Path Review has been published. This marks the closure of our second year of publishing. What started out as a simple idea with no long-term plan has become an extension of our passion and appreciation of the arts. We look forward to the third year and beyond and will rollout other media following the goals and mission of Stone Path Review. We also hope to have a release party in the near future. Please follow our blog or on Facebook for more information and announcements.

Thank you to our readers and artist who trust your work with us. We would not be here without you.

This issue’s featured artist is writer Kevin Zepper and includes an interview, along with a selection of his poetry.

Poetry by: A. J. Huffman, Bradley Hamlin, Craig Steele, Don Cellini, James Valvis, Kevin Zepper, Milton P. Ehrlich, Ryan Bermuda
Short Stories by: Melodie Corrigall, Tabitha Holcombe
Visual Arts by: Dr. Ernest Williamson III, John J. Sikkila, Susan Sweetland Garay
Cover Photograph by: Aaron Bowen

Summer 2013 – Now Available

The Summer 2013 issue of Stone Path Review is now published and ready for your reading and viewing pleasure. This issue features an interview with Ben Coffman; poetry by Brendan Sullivan, Changming Yuan, Les Wicks, Peycho Kanev, and Tricia Knoll; photography and drawings by A.J. Huffman, Ben Coffman, Joezel Jang, and W. Jack Savage.

Thank you very much to our contributing artists and of course anyone who takes the time to read the issues.

Spring 2013 – Now Online

The Spring 2013 edition of Stone Path Review is now online here. The PDF and printed version will be available soon.

As Winter slowly becomes Spring, we celebrate National Poetry Month, and the power and majestic beauty of nature and the mind.

Featured in this issue is an interview with writer Regina Bou and work from these fine artists: Aaron Bowen, Debbie Crawford, Jay Duret, Kenneth Pobo, Pete Armetta, Rachel Dacus, Thomas Zimmerman, Valentina Cano, and Don Cellini.

Guest Writer – Alan S. Kleiman

Stone Path Review presents poetry by guest writer Alan Kleiman – https://www.facebook.com/AlanKleimanAce. His poetry has appeared in Verse Wisconsin, The Criterion, Camel Saloon, Fringe, The Montucky Review, Pyrta, and other journals. His chapbook, Grand Slam, is forthcoming from Crisis Chronicles Press. He lives in New York City and works as an attorney.


BLEUETS
Tomorrow night I will see
what I am to become
A teetotaler in the forest
Surrounded by giant redwoods
And thick underbrush

The rabbits bump their heads trying to hop
There are blueberry bushes
amongst these thickets
And small birds fend for the fruit
I filled a basket with bleuets
And spread them on my teeth
Though I looked ghastly
I smiled broadly
Doing mischief in the woods
In my heart.


THE NEW ORDER
Yesterday I knew no one
Today my name is clear
But I don’t speak
Instead
All stays within
To rearrange voices
Thoughts
And make way for the new order